4 Things Terrible Bosses Typically Do (But Great Leaders Wouldn’t Dare)

4 Things Terrible Bosses Typically Do (But Great Leaders Wouldn’t Dare)

Great insight on what works and what doesn’t for bosses, by Marcel Schwantes, Principal and founder, of Leadership From the Core, writing here for Inc: Bosses that establish power and control over their people and processes with a carrot-and-stick approach to motivation certainly get results and have succeeded for decades. These bosses, however, are also notorious for killing intrinsic motivation and turning good, smart, and creative employees into order takers who will quickly disengage from their work.

5 Leadership Rules From the Past That Don’t Work Now (If You’re Doing Any Of These, Stop)

5 Leadership Rules From the Past That Don’t Work Now (If You’re Doing Any Of These, Stop)

“I think it’s pretty fair to say that most of us want to be considered a successful leader. However, what worked in the past won’t work now. Rapid change requires agile leaders who think differently and can adapt to the changing times”, says Performance Strategist, Laura Garnett, writing for Inc. We agree wholeheartedly!

6 Things Bad Bosses Always Fear (but Great Leaders Always Do)

6 Things Bad Bosses Always Fear (but Great Leaders Always Do)

Peter Drucker famously said: “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” The quote was actually attributed to him and made famous in 2006 by Mark Fields, chief executive at Ford. Twelve years later, it’s corporate-speak for purpose-led and human-centered businesses, and truth is, culture eats strategy for lunch and dinner too. The premise held by Drucker is that a company’s culture will trump any effort by a management team to enforce a strategy that is incompatible with that culture. In the end, it’s culture that wins. Here is one of my favourite writers, Marcel Schwantes, Principal and founder, of Leadership From the Core, writing for Inc on why culture wins.

6 Highly Productive Morning Routines That Don’t Require Getting Up Insanely Early

6 Highly Productive Morning Routines That Don’t Require Getting Up Insanely Early

Early mornings are often touted as the key to success–getting up at the crack of dawn is a daily habit you must cultivate to get more out of your day and maximize productivity. Here’s a refreshing alternative view written for Inc by Madeleine Dore. I feel better already!
 
Yet, despite our best intentions to rise early without a groan, many of us continue to reach for the snooze alarm–only to later berate ourselves for not instantly becoming morning people. When we’re told a morning routine will transform our day, will success always be outside our reach because we are late to rise?

13 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence

13 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence

In 1995, psychologist and science journalist Daniel Goleman published a book introducing most of the world to the nascent concept of emotional intelligence. The idea–that an ability to understand and manage emotions greatly increases our chances of success–quickly took off, and it went on to greatly influence the way people think about emotions and human behavior. Here is Justin Bariso, Founder of Insight’s, take on what EI looks like win the real world. (Original article published in Inc.com.)

The Two Mental Shifts Highly Successful People Make.

The Two Mental Shifts Highly Successful People Make.

“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” — Max Planck, German quantum theorist and Nobel Prize winner. There are two primary mental shifts that occur in the lives of all highly successful people. Many make the first, but very few make the second, argues Benjamin P. Hardy, writing here for Quartz Media.

Both of these shifts require a great deal of mental stretching from conventional and societal ways of thinking. In many ways, these shifts require you to unlearn the negative and sabotaging programming from your youth, public education, and even adulthood.

3 Ways Leaders Influence Company Culture (And Don’t Even Know It)

3 Ways Leaders Influence Company Culture (And Don’t Even Know It)

When Alan Mulally became the CEO of Ford in 2006, the motor company’s market share was plummeting. The problem was internal: Teams weren’t communicating or working towards a unified vision. Mulally turned that around with his leadership. Taking a look at that case and others, Carlos Dominguez, President, of Sprinklr comments here for Inc.